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Cubanazos, established to provide nationwide U.S. news and political issues affecting the island of Cuba. We sincerely hope you enjoy the Cubanazos.com website and by all means post your comments/opinions by using the comments option below each post.

Artie Ayala & Omar "El Bombero" Fernandez



May 25, 2009

Memorial Day Video Tributes

The USMC Silent Drill Platoon

Memorial Day Tribute - Thank You !!!!!!

From Artie Ayala & Omar Fernandez - To All The Soldiers Out There Who Defend Our Country's Freedom ...Thank You !!!!!!



Daniel Smith has written a song to express appreciation for our U.S. Armed Forces active and retired. The Thank You Foundation has adopted it as its theme song for its "Mission of Appreciation". It is a wonderful tribute and "Thank You" to those who have served and are serving today.

When you consider the service and sacrifice of the 26 million plus veterans of this great country, we all should be willing to thank a WWII Veteran one more time, help change the name of the "Forgotten War" and thank those who served in Korea, let a Viet-Nam Veteran hear the words "Thank You" for perhaps the first time, and let the men and women who wear the uniform today know that their service and sacrifice is appreciated.

For more information about how to support a Veteran or Service Member, please visit the foundation web site at www.thethankyoufoundation.org or call toll free at 1-877-280-8893.

Although a bit old of an article thought it was worth posting for those who haven't read it !




Tuesday, August 10, 2004
How Can Someone Who Lives in Insane Luxury Be a Star in Today's World?

As I begin to write this, I "slug" it, as we writers say, which means I put a heading on top of the document to identify it. This heading is one line: FINAL, and it gives me a shiver to write it. I have been doing this column for so long that I cannot even recall when I started. I loved writing this column so much for so long I came to believe it would never end. It worked well for a long time, but gradually, my changing as a person and the world's change have overtaken it.

On a small scale, Morton's, while better than ever, no longer attracts as many stars as it used to. It still brings in the rich people in droves and definitely some stars. I saw Samuel L. Jackson there a few days ago, and we had a nice visit, and right before that, I saw and had a splendid talk with Warren Beatty in an elevator, in which we agreed that Splendor in the Grass was a super movie. But Morton's is not the star galaxy it once was, though it probably will be again.

Beyond that, a bigger change has happened. I no longer think Hollywood stars are terribly important. They are uniformly pleasant, friendly people, and they treat me better than I deserve to be treated. But a man or woman who makes a huge wage for memorizing lines and reciting them in front of a camera is no longer my idea of a shining star we should all look up to.

How can a man or woman who makes an eight-figure wage and lives in insane luxury really be a star in today's world, if by a "star" we mean someone bright and powerful and attractive as a role model? Real stars are not riding around in the backs of limousines or in Porsches or getting trained in yoga or Pilates and eating only raw fruit while they have Vietnamese girls do their nails.

They can be interesting, nice people, but they are not heroes to me any longer.

A real star is the soldier of the 4th Infantry Division who poked his head into a hole on a farm near Tikrit, Iraq. He could have been met by a bomb or a hail of AK-47 bullets. Instead, he faced an abject Saddam Hussein and the gratitude of all of the decent people of the world. A real star is the U.S. soldier who was sent to disarm a bomb next to a road north of Baghdad. He approached it, and the bomb went off and killed him. A real star, the kind who haunts my memory night and day, is the U.S. soldier in Baghdad who saw a little girl playing with a piece of unexploded ordnance on a street near where he was guarding a station. He pushed her aside and threw himself on it just as it exploded. He left a family desolate in California and a little girl alive in Baghdad.

The stars who deserve media attention are not the ones who have lavish weddings on TV but the ones who patrol the streets of Mosul even after two of their buddies were murdered and their bodies battered and stripped for the sin of trying to protect Iraqis from terrorists. We put couples with incomes of $100 million a year on the covers of our magazines. The noncoms and officers who barely scrape by on military pay but stand on guard in Afghanistan and Iraq and on ships and in submarines and near the Arctic Circle are anonymous as they live and die.

I am no longer comfortable being a part of the system that has such poor values, and I do not want to perpetuate those values by pretending that who is eating at Morton's is a big subject. There are plenty of other stars in the American firmament .... the policemen and women who go off on patrol in South Central and have no idea if they will return alive, The orderlies and paramedics who bring in people who have been in terrible accidents and prepare them for surgery, the teachers and nurses who throw their whole spirits into caring for autistic children, the kind men and women who work in hospices and in cancer wards. Think of each and every fireman who was running up the stairs at the World Trade Center as the towers began to collapse.

Now you have my idea of a real hero. We are not responsible for the operation of the universe, and what happens to us is not terribly important. God is real, not a fiction, and when we turn over our lives to Him, he takes far better care of us than we could ever do for ourselves. In a word, we make ourselves sane when we fire ourselves as the directors of the movie of our lives and turn the power over to Him. I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters. This is my highest and best use as a human.

I can put it another way. Years ago, I realized I could never be as great an actor as Olivier or as good a comic as Steve Martin .... or Martin Mull or Fred Willard -- or as good an economist as Samuelson or Friedman or as good a writer as Fitzgerald. Or even remotely close to any of them. But I could be a devoted father to my son, husband to my wife and, above all, a good son to the parents who had done so much for me. This came to be my main task in life. I did it moderately well with my son, pretty well with my wife and well indeed with my parents (with my sister's help). I cared for and paid attention to them in their declining years. I stayed with my father as he got sick, went into extremis and then into a coma and then entered immortality with my sister and me reading him the Psalms.

This was the only point at which my life touched the lives of the soldiers in Iraq or the firefighters in New York. I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters and that it is my duty, in return for the lavish life God has devolved upon me, to help others He has placed in my path. This is my highest and best use as a human.

By Ben Stein
Although a bit old of an article thought it was worth posting for those who haven't read it !



Tuesday, August 10, 2004
How Can Someone Who Lives in Insane Luxury Be a Star in Today's World?

As I begin to write this, I "slug" it, as we writers say, which means I put a heading on top of the document to identify it. This heading is one line: FINAL, and it gives me a shiver to write it. I have been doing this column for so long that I cannot even recall when I started. I loved writing this column so much for so long I came to believe it would never end. It worked well for a long time, but gradually, my changing as a person and the world's change have overtaken it.

On a small scale, Morton's, while better than ever, no longer attracts as many stars as it used to. It still brings in the rich people in droves and definitely some stars. I saw Samuel L. Jackson there a few days ago, and we had a nice visit, and right before that, I saw and had a splendid talk with Warren Beatty in an elevator, in which we agreed that Splendor in the Grass was a super movie. But Morton's is not the star galaxy it once was, though it probably will be again.

Beyond that, a bigger change has happened. I no longer think Hollywood stars are terribly important. They are uniformly pleasant, friendly people, and they treat me better than I deserve to be treated. But a man or woman who makes a huge wage for memorizing lines and reciting them in front of a camera is no longer my idea of a shining star we should all look up to.

How can a man or woman who makes an eight-figure wage and lives in insane luxury really be a star in today's world, if by a "star" we mean someone bright and powerful and attractive as a role model? Real stars are not riding around in the backs of limousines or in Porsches or getting trained in yoga or Pilates and eating only raw fruit while they have Vietnamese girls do their nails.

They can be interesting, nice people, but they are not heroes to me any longer.

A real star is the soldier of the 4th Infantry Division who poked his head into a hole on a farm near Tikrit, Iraq. He could have been met by a bomb or a hail of AK-47 bullets. Instead, he faced an abject Saddam Hussein and the gratitude of all of the decent people of the world. A real star is the U.S. soldier who was sent to disarm a bomb next to a road north of Baghdad. He approached it, and the bomb went off and killed him. A real star, the kind who haunts my memory night and day, is the U.S. soldier in Baghdad who saw a little girl playing with a piece of unexploded ordnance on a street near where he was guarding a station. He pushed her aside and threw himself on it just as it exploded. He left a family desolate in California and a little girl alive in Baghdad.

The stars who deserve media attention are not the ones who have lavish weddings on TV but the ones who patrol the streets of Mosul even after two of their buddies were murdered and their bodies battered and stripped for the sin of trying to protect Iraqis from terrorists. We put couples with incomes of $100 million a year on the covers of our magazines. The noncoms and officers who barely scrape by on military pay but stand on guard in Afghanistan and Iraq and on ships and in submarines and near the Arctic Circle are anonymous as they live and die.

I am no longer comfortable being a part of the system that has such poor values, and I do not want to perpetuate those values by pretending that who is eating at Morton's is a big subject. There are plenty of other stars in the American firmament .... the policemen and women who go off on patrol in South Central and have no idea if they will return alive, The orderlies and paramedics who bring in people who have been in terrible accidents and prepare them for surgery, the teachers and nurses who throw their whole spirits into caring for autistic children, the kind men and women who work in hospices and in cancer wards. Think of each and every fireman who was running up the stairs at the World Trade Center as the towers began to collapse.

Now you have my idea of a real hero. We are not responsible for the operation of the universe, and what happens to us is not terribly important. God is real, not a fiction, and when we turn over our lives to Him, he takes far better care of us than we could ever do for ourselves. In a word, we make ourselves sane when we fire ourselves as the directors of the movie of our lives and turn the power over to Him. I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters. This is my highest and best use as a human.

I can put it another way. Years ago, I realized I could never be as great an actor as Olivier or as good a comic as Steve Martin .... or Martin Mull or Fred Willard -- or as good an economist as Samuelson or Friedman or as good a writer as Fitzgerald. Or even remotely close to any of them. But I could be a devoted father to my son, husband to my wife and, above all, a good son to the parents who had done so much for me. This came to be my main task in life. I did it moderately well with my son, pretty well with my wife and well indeed with my parents (with my sister's help). I cared for and paid attention to them in their declining years. I stayed with my father as he got sick, went into extremis and then into a coma and then entered immortality with my sister and me reading him the Psalms.

This was the only point at which my life touched the lives of the soldiers in Iraq or the firefighters in New York. I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters and that it is my duty, in return for the lavish life God has devolved upon me, to help others He has placed in my path. This is my highest and best use as a human.

By Ben Stein


May 20, 2009

White House Video's

For those who might have missed this last year ...here you are !



Cuba Solidarity Day 2009



What
For one day, this May 20, the world will stand in solidarity with the legitimate aspirations and hopes of the Cuban people for freedom and democracy.

Why
May 20th marks the 108th anniversary of Cuba’s independence from Spain. Yet the struggle to realize the full blessings of independence in a modern world so fiercely desired by the Cuban people remains incomplete. Individual rights and liberties, the touchstones of a modern democratic society, are callously denied by a communist dictatorship that has ruled the island with absolute power for more than 50 years. Rights of speech, travel, association, and access to information as well basic economic freedoms are withheld in ways inconsistent with universal values and fundamental human rights. For this reason May 20 th, Cuba Solidarity Day, remains closely associated around the world with the legitimate aspirations and hopes of all the Cuban people, especially those who form part of a robust and growing civil society movement who most courageously resist cruel and arbitrary demands for obedience and silence.

Take action
1. Organize an event (panel discussion, march, vigil, etc.) ACTION
2. Target local and international media through opinion pieces
3. Join Global Cuba Solidarity Movement on Facebook
4. Upload events and learn more on www.solidaridadcuba.org/eng/

May 18, 2009

Someone Gets It!

Why is it so difficult for the adulating imbeciles who voted for the Arrogant Fraud to see the truth? Even a Brit "gets it" for Gods sake!

May 8, 2009

How It Starts!

Yesterday, my wife and I had the distinct pleasure of meeting new author and new friend Eddie Calcines. I finally met the gentleman whom I have only had the privilege of speaking to by phone and email. We were not disappointed. Mr. Calcines read excerpts from his book, Leaving Glorytown, with heart felt compassion and sincerity of word. His visit to the Key West bookstore, Voltaire, was well received and attended. Both my wife and I felt the emotion and conviction of his words which at times made it impossible to keep the moisture from our eyes. Eddie's words and conviction are equal to a knowing wink from a friend that shows the empathy that only Cubans can share.

Also in attendance was Alejandro Pascual, friend and keeper of the keys of the San Carlos Institute in Key West. We look forward to Eddie making an appearance at the SCI in the near future.

Sincere thanks to my friend and the brains behind this blog, Artie Ayala, for his efforts in making Eddie's trip to Key West a great success!

Now for the antithesis of the previous words, click on the link above to see where we are heading. Shades of Glorytown!

May 5, 2009

Eduardo Calcines, Author of Leaving Glorytown Visits South Florida


If you live in the South Florida area you will not want to miss this opportunity to meet Eduardo Calcines, Author of Leaving Glorytown - One Boy's Struggle Under Castro. Eduardo Calcines is currently visiting South Florida and will be at the following locations for a book signing and to talk about his book.


Wednesday, May 6, 7:30 PM
Barnes & Noble Booksellers
12405 North Kendall Drive

Thursday, May 7, 5:00 PM
Voltaire Books
"The Last Independent Bookstore"
330 Simonton St.
Key West, FL 33040

May 4, 2009

La Cuchufleta

Like Chirino says, "En Cuba No Falta Nada!